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Searching large, unordered databases for a desired item is a time-consuming task for classical computers, but quantum computers are expected to perform these searches much more quickly. Previous research has shown that Grover's search algorithm, proposed in 1996, is an optimal quantum search algorithm, meaning no other quantum algorithm can search faster. However, implementing Grover's algorithm on a quantum system has been challenging.

Now in a new study, researchers have implemented Grover's with trapped atomic ions. The algorithm uses three qubits, which corresponds to a of 8 (23) items. When used to search the database for one or two items, the Grover algorithm's success probabilities were—as expected—significantly higher than the best theoretical success probabilities for .

The researchers, Caroline Figgatt et al., at the University of Maryland and the National Science Foundation, have published a paper on their results in a recent issue of Nature Communications.



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-01-qubit-grover-quantum.html#jCp

Searching large, unordered databases for a desired item is a time-consuming task for classical computers, but quantum computers are expected to perform these searches much more quickly. Previous research has shown that Grover's search algorithm, proposed in 1996, is an optimal quantum search algorithm, meaning no other quantum algorithm can search faster. However, implementing Grover's algorithm on a quantum system has been challenging.

Now in a new study, researchers have implemented Grover's algorithm with trapped atomic ions. The algorithm uses three qubits, which corresponds to a database of 8 (23) items. When used to search the database for one or two items, the Grover algorithm's success probabilities were—as expected—significantly higher than the best theoretical success probabilities for classical computers.

The researchers, Caroline Figgatt et al., at the University of Maryland and the National Science Foundation, have published a paper on their results in a recent issue of Nature Communications.

To read more, click here.

Category: Science