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In 1991, University of Utah chemist Joel Miller developed the first magnet with carbon-based, or organic, components that was stable at room temperature. It was a great advance in magnetics, and he's been exploring the applications ever since.

Twenty-five years later, physicists Christoph Boehme and Valy Vardeny demonstrated a method to convert quantum waves into electrical current. They too, knew they'd discovered something important, but didn't know its application.

Now those technologies have come together and could be the first step towards a new generation of faster, more efficient and more flexible electronics.

Working together, Miller, Boehme, Vardeny and their colleagues have shown that an organic-based magnet can carry waves of quantum mechanical magnetization, called magnons, and convert those waves to electrical signals. It's a breakthrough for the field of magnonics (electronic systems that use magnons instead of electrons) because magnons had previously been sent through inorganic that are more difficult to handle.

"Going to these organic materials, we have an opportunity to push magnonics into an area that is more controllable than ," Miller says. Their results are published today in Nature Materials.



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-03-quantum-magnetic-wavenext-generation-electronics-closer.html#jCp

In 1991, University of Utah chemist Joel Miller developed the first magnet with carbon-based, or organic, components that was stable at room temperature. It was a great advance in magnetics, and he's been exploring the applications ever since.

Twenty-five years later, physicists Christoph Boehme and Valy Vardeny demonstrated a method to convert quantum waves into electrical current.
Theytoo, knew they'd discovered something important, but didn't know its application.

Now those technologies have come together and could be the first step towards a new generation of faster, more efficient and more flexible electronics.

Working together, Miller, Boehme, Vardeny and their colleagues have shown that an organic-based magnet can carry waves of quantum mechanical magnetization, called magnons, and convert those waves
to electrical signals. It's a breakthrough for the field of magnonics (electronic systems that use magnons instead of electrons) because magnons had previously been sent through inorganic materials that are more difficult to handle.

"Going to these organic materials, we have an opportunity to push magnonics into an area that is more controllable than inorganic materials," Miller says. Their results are published today in Nature Materials.

To read more, click here.

Category: Science