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Materials scientists at Duke University computationally predicted the electrical and optical properties of semiconductors made from extended organic molecules sandwiched by inorganic structures.

These types of so-called layered "hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites"—or HOIPs—are popular targets for light-based devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The ability to build accurate models of these materials atom-by-atom will allow researchers to explore new material designs for next-generation devices.

The results appeared online on October 4 in Physical Review Letters.

"Ideally we would like to be able to manipulate the organic and inorganic components of these types of materials independently and create semiconductors with new, predictable properties," said David Mitzi, the Simon Family Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science at Duke. "This study shows that we are able to match and explain the experimental properties of these materials through complex supercomputer simulations, which is quite exciting."

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Category: Science