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It will be a feat of engineering and physics at the smallest scales, but it could open the biggest doors—to new science and more advanced technologies. UC Santa Barbara physicists Ania Jayich and David Weld, and materials scientist Kunal Mukherjee, are teaming up to build an atom-defect hybrid quantum system—a sensor technology that would use the power of quantum science to unlock the mysteries of the atomic and subatomic world.

"We're at this tipping point where we know there's a lot of impactful and fundamentally exciting things we can do," said Jayich, whose research investigates quantum effects at the nanoscale. The $1.5 million grant from the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Sciences will kickstart the development of a system that will allow researchers an unusually high level of control over atoms while simultaneously leaving their "quantumness" untouched.

"In this whole field of quantum technology, that has been the big challenge," Jayich said. In the quirky and highly unintuitive world of quantum mechanics, she explained, objects can exist in a superposition of many places at once, and entangled elements separated by thousands of miles can be inextricably linked—phenomena which, in turn, have opened up new and powerful possibilities for areas such as sensing, computing and the deepest investigations of nature.

However, the coherence that is the signature of these quantum behaviors—a state of information that is the foundation of quantum technology—is exceedingly fragile and fleeting.

"Quantum coherence is such a delicate phenomenon," Jayich said. "Any uncontrolled interaction with the environment will kill it. And that's the whole challenge behind advancing this field—how do we preserve the very delicate quantumness of an atom or defect, or anything?" To study a quantum element such as an atom, one would have to interrogate it, she explained, but the act of measuring can also destroy its quantum nature.

Fortunately, Jayich and colleagues see a way around this conundrum.

"It's a hybrid atomic- and solid-state system," Jayich said. Key to this technology is the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond, an extensively studied point defect in diamond's carbon atom lattice. The NV center is comprised of a vacancy created by a missing carbon atom next to another vacancy that is substituted with a nitrogen atom. With its several unpaired electrons, it is highly sensitive to and interactive with external perturbations, such as the minute magnetic or electric fields that would occur in the presence of individual atoms of interest.

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Category: Science