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In an advance that may help researchers scale up quantum devices, an MIT team has developed a method to "recruit" neighboring quantum bits made of nanoscale defects in diamond, so that instead of causing disruptions they help carry out quantum operations.

Quantum devices perform operations using , called "qubits," that can represent the two states corresponding to classic binary bits—a zero or a one—or a "quantum superposition" of both states simultaneously. The unique superposition state can enable quantum computers to solve problems that are practically impossible for classical computers, potentially spurring breakthroughs in biosensing, neuroimaging, machine learning, and other applications.

One promising qubit candidate is a in diamond, called a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center, which holds electrons that can be manipulated by light and microwaves. In response, the defect emits photons that can carry quantum information. Because of their solid-state environments, however, NV centers are always surrounded by many other unknown defects with different spin properties, called "spin defects." When the measurable NV-center qubit interacts with those spin defects, the qubit loses its coherent quantum state—"decoheres"— and operations fall apart. Traditional solutions try to identify these disrupting defects to protect the qubit from them.

In a paper published Feb. 25 in Physical Letters Review, the researchers describe a method that uses an NV center to probe its environment and uncover the existence of several nearby spin defects. Then, the researchers can pinpoint the defects' locations and control them to achieve a coherent quantum state—essentially leveraging them as additional qubits.

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Category: Science