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The theory of everything is the idea that all of the main physical forces in the world around us: gravity, strong and weak nuclear forces, and electromagnetism, can be worked into one all-encompassing theory. 

As of right now, physics theories solve one or two of the interactions of these forces, but no single one explains them all together, yet. Physicists are revising an experiment proposed by Richard Feynman in 1957 to hopefully find a uniting theory of everything. 

The researchers from Oxford University and the University College London (UCL) have successfully found a theory that combines electromagnetism and the weak nuclear force, but none to connect all of them. Steven Weinberg, a theoretical physicist on the team and a Nobel Laureate, is leading the research.

Einstein's laws of general relativity and the theories of quantum mechanics do a fantastic job of explaining the world when they're kept in their own domains. However, they fall apart if you use the ideas therein to explain physics that the theory doesn't govern.

In order to grasp what the theory of everything would mean for Physics and the work that's going on to revitalize Feynman's ideas, first we need to understand the full scope of a "theory of everything."

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Category: Science