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Data may be king, but new research by the Centre for Quantum Computation and Intelligent Systems means we may soon see a coup. UTS's team of computer scientists are leading the development of a new pattern of programming language that will underpin how we use quantum computers and how we process data.
n today's deeply connected and informed society, data is everywhere. We collect digital information at an astounding rate, feeding data into enormous databases that monitor everything from genome sequencing, to astronomy and weather patterns, the rise and fall of global finance markets, even the social media accounts we manage on our hand-held smartphones.

Such technology enables society to accurately predict weather, prevent disease and manage consumer behaviour, but there are still many complex problems that cannot be solved by even the most advanced computers. And, as we continue to collect exponential amounts of data, this disconnect becomes even wider. Enter the world of the quantum – a new, and yet-to-be developed, computer that promises faster, more secure and more powerful processing, with problem-solving capabilities far greater than any classical computer.

A team of researchers from UTS's Centre for Quantum Computation and Intelligent Systems (QCIS) are at the forefront of developing a new pattern of programming language that will underpin how we use these quantum computers. They are Distinguished Professor Mingsheng Ying, and Professors Yuan Feng and Runyao Duan.

"The majority of research taking place in the field at this moment is in building quantum computing hardware," says Ying. "But once a quantum computer is available and purchasable from the market, then quantum software will play a key role."

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