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The dynamic field of medical laser applications continually offers new systems and techniques enabling less invasive or more targeted treatments. But the path from the lab to the clinic can be slowed by "a multiplicity of barriers" requiring patience, persistence, and financial support, note authors of an article published today (16 June) in the Journal of Biomedical Optics.

In "Medical laser application - translation into the clinics", Ronald Sroka, Laser-Forschungslabor, Hospital of Munich University, and his co-authors detail the path to successful implementation with examples of promising technologies and their translation into acceptance in the .

At technical conferences, unmet clinical needs and detailed requests from clinicians are discussed and innovative techniques are introduced, say the authors in detailing the path.

Subsequent research is informed by this interchange of ideas, and includes technicians and companies whose contributions are indispensable in developing prototypes and initiating clinical trials.

Only after clinical testing and comparison with established nonoptical clinical procedures can the positive or negative impact of new biophotonic technologies be assessed - another of the barriers that must be worked through before achieving full acceptance in the medical community.

Hardly surprising. The use of various forms of electromagnetic energy for treatment and curing of diseases and medical conditions would be an economic threat to both the medical establishment and the enormous pharmaceautical industry. To read more, click here.