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A team of developers in Canada has come up with a way for ordinary people to track extraterrestrial encounters - with their own satellite.

Their device, called the CubeSat for Disclosure, is a low-Earth orbit satellite which uses ionized radiation, cameras, and radar to capture data. 

With enough funds, which the team is hoping to gain through its Indiegogo campaign, the CubeSat will be able to 'concretely verify objects in space.'

It's about time. Great idea, but it needs to be executed properly. The big problem is that they will face stiff resistance from the Federal national security secrecy state and anti-disclosure establishment. So, they'll need more than just good luck trying to get NASA, SpaceX, or any other major commercial launch company to launch them, although they claim that they have a commercial launch company already lined up, IOS Interorbital. It will require a fairly large constellation of cubesats, equipped with all manner of hyperspectral sensing and imaging technology to do this effectively. And if they were to put all their eggs in one launching basket, I would not be at all surprised if there were a catastrophic launch failure, or things started going amiss while up in oribit. ;-( But it is certainly doable, IF the powers that be allow it to be done. And that's a huge IF. If you want real, unambiguous disclosure, this is the way to get it.

The team says that for $10,000, you can help design and have complete control over one cubesat. Pretty cool! I've got an idea for one. But it might cost a little more than ten grand. You're strictly limited in the amount of instrumentation space you have to work with, as significant internal cubesat space has to be devoted to power, communications, and other non-mission specific related essential functions. So, you really have to boil things down to only the most essential detection instrumentation. Wow. This is truly exciting stuff. :-))

P.S Prediction: the Feds WILL shut them down. They will claim that it will produce a space traffic hazard to what's already orbiting up there. Dead on arrival?


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