Pin It

A Danish-American research team has shown that it is possible to produce Majorana particles in a new building material. The research, led by scientists from Niels Bohr institute, University of Copenhagen, paves the road for new types of experiments—and at the same time represents an important contribution to the construction of the information circuits of tomorrow.

Ever since Ettore Majorana—legendary and mythical Italian physicist—back in 1937 suggested the existence of a particle that is also its own anti-particle, scientists have been searching for the "Majorana particle," as it is has come to be known.

This far the search has been to no avail

A team of scientists from Center for Quantum Devices at Niels Bohr Institute (NBI) and from Purdue University, USA, have—however—recently contributed to the advancement of Majorana research.

Not by finding the elusive particle itself, but by figuring out how to produce a material in which electrons behave in accordance with the theoretical predictions for Majorana .

The results of the are published in this week issue of the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-09-material-quantum.html#jCp

A Danish-American research team has shown that it is possible to produce Majorana particles in a new building material. The research, led by scientists from Niels Bohr institute, University of Copenhagen, paves the road for new types of experiments—and at the same time represents an important contribution to the construction of the information circuits of tomorrow.

Ever since Ettore Majorana—legendary and mythical Italian physicist—back in 1937 suggested the existence of a particle that is also its own anti-particle, scientists have been searching for the "Majorana particle," as it is has come to be known.

A team of scientists from Center for Quantum Devices at Niels Bohr Institute (NBI) and from Purdue University, USA, have—however—recently contributed to the advancement of Majorana research.

Not by finding the elusive particle itself, but by figuring out how to produce a material in which electrons behave in accordance with the theoretical predictions for Majorana particles.

The results of the research project are published in this week issue of the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

To read more, click here.