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Implementing such a detector proved harder than anticipated. In most semiconductor materials, plasmons undergo rapid damping—that is, they die down—due to electron collisions with impurities. Graphene was seen as a promising way out, but until recently, it was not clean enough.

The authors of the research presented a solution for the long-standing problem of resonant T-wave detection. They created a photodetector (figure 1) made of encapsulated between crystals of boron nitride and coupled to a terahertz antenna. In this , impurities are expelled to the exterior of the graphene flake, enabling plasmons to propagate freely. The graphene sheet confined by metal leads forms a plasmon resonator, and the bilayer structure of enables wave velocity tuning in a wide range.



Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-12-t-wave-detector-electronic-sea-graphene.html#jCp

Implementing such a detector proved harder than anticipated. In most semiconductor materials, plasmons undergo rapid damping—that is, they die down—due to electron collisions with impurities. Graphene was seen as a promising way out, but until recently, it was not clean enough.

The authors of the research presented a
solutionfor the long-standing problem of resonant T-wave detection. They created a photodetector (figure 1) made of bilayer graphene encapsulated between crystals of boron nitride and coupled to a terahertz antenna. In this sandwich structure, impurities are expelled to the exterior of the graphene flake, enabling plasmons to propagate freely. The graphene sheet confined by metal leads forms a plasmon resonator, and the bilayer structure of graphene enables wave velocity tuning in a wide range.

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