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Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) nanomaterials such as molybdenite (MoS2), which possess a similar structure as graphene, have been donned the materials of the future for their wide range of potential applications in biomedicine, sensors, catalysts, photodetectors and energy storage devices. The smaller counterpart of 2D TMDs, also known as TMD quantum dots (QDs) further accentuate the optical and electronic properties of TMDs, and are highly exploitable for catalytic and biomedical applications. However, TMD QDs is hardly used in applications as the synthesis of TMD QDs remains challenging.

Now, engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have developed a cost-effective and scalable strategy to synthesise TMD QDs. The new strategy also allows the properties of TMD QDs to be engineered specifically for different applications, thereby making a leap forward in helping to realise the potential of TMD QDs.

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