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n certain exotic situations, a collection of atoms can transition to a superfluid state, flouting the normal rules of liquid behavior. Unlike a normal, viscous fluid, the atoms in a superfluid flow unhindered by friction. This remarkable free motion is similar to the movement of electron pairs in a superconductor, the prefix 'super' in both cases describing the phenomenon of resistanceless flow. Harnessing this effect is of particular interest in the field of atomtronics, since superfluid atom circuits can recreate the functionality of superconductor circuits, with atoms zipping about instead of electrons. Now, JQI scientists have added an important technique to the atomtronics arsenal, a method for analyzing a superfluid circuit component known as a 'weak link'.

The result, detailed in the online journal Physical Review X, is the first direct measurement of the current-phase relationship of a weak link in a cold atom system.

"What we have done is invented a way to characterize a particular circuit element [in a superfluid atomtronic circuit]," says Stephen Eckel, lead author of the paper. "This is similar to characterizing a component in an ordinary electrical circuit, where one measures the current that flows through the component vs. the voltage across it."

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