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The search for a superconductor that can work under less extreme conditions than hundreds of degrees below zero or at pressures like those near the center of the Earth is a quest for a revolutionary new power—one that's needed for magnetically levitating cars and ultra-efficient power grids of the future.

But developing this kind of "room temperature" superconductor is a feat science has yet to achieve.

A University of Central Florida researcher, however, is working to move this goal closer to realization, with some of his latest research published recently in the journal Communications Physics.

In the study, Yasuyuki Nakajima, an assistant professor in UCF's Department of Physics, and co-authors showed they could get a closer look at what is happening in "strange" metals.

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