Pin It
"The results of these experiments have, in the last few decades, converged upon a consensus from which few professional cosmologists would dissent:
  1. At the largest scale, the geometry of the universe is indistinguishable from Euclidean (flat), and the distribution of matter and energy within it is homogeneous and isotropic.
  2. The universe evolved from an extremely hot, dense, phase starting about 13.7 billion years ago from our point of observation, which resulted in the abundances of light elements observed today.
  3. The evidence of this event is imprinted on the cosmic background radiation which can presently be observed in the microwave frequency band. All large-scale structures in the universe grew from gravitational amplification of scale-independent quantum fluctuations in density.
  4. The flatness, homogeneity, and isotropy of the universe is best explained by a period of inflation shortly after the origin of the universe, which expanded a tiny region of space, smaller than a subatomic particle, to a volume much greater than the presently observable universe.
  5. Consequently, the universe we can observe today is bounded by a horizon, about forty billion light years away in every direction (greater than the 13.7 billion light years you might expect since the universe has been expanding since its origin), but the universe is much, much larger than what we can see; every year another light year comes into view in every direction."
Read John Walker's book review here.

Note the "horizon" above is only half the story. It is our past-particle horizon. The important horizon is our future event horizon.

Tamara Davis Fig 1.1 Ph.D. (2004) University New South Wales

That's the hologram screen whose asymptotically constant area = entropy is the inverse of the dark energy density of 10^-7 ergs/cc accelerating the expansion rate of the 3D space of our observable piece of the Level 1 Tegmark parallel worlds.



http://space.mit.edu/home/tegmark/crazy.html